The Photography Club went on their first outing of the semester to Acadia National Park Sept. 16. Approximately 29 students made the trip in hopes of capturing the park’s rugged landscape.

At least five cars carried the club to Acadia, so students experienced different parts of the park depending on which car they were in.  Some of the frequented spots on the trip were Thunder Hole, Otter Cliff, Sand Beach and other spots along the park loop. Some groups made hikes up Gorham and Cadillac Mountains for a higher perspective.

The dense fog that lingered over Acadia on Saturday made shooting landscape photos difficult, but many of the students were able to take advantage of the fog by using it creatively in their photographs.

“There was a really thick fog bank right on the coast… You’d go out on the rocks and there’s nothing… It made it challenging. People had to be more creative,” public relations officer Ben Taro said.

Alison Berube, the photo club’s treasurer, explained how she used the fog to create a certain effect in her photos.

“I wouldn’t be able to tell you specific places, but there was this one with tons of fog going through the trees. That was really nice,” Berube said.

Photos from the Acadia trip, along with many other beautiful images, can be found on the UMaine Photography Club’s Facebook page.

Taro explained how the unprecedented number of people on the trip created a new leadership experience he and the other officers hadn’t had on previous trips.

“Even though it wasn’t the best day, it was great to get a group of new photographers out there,” Taro said.

The atmosphere the photography club wants to create is one of openness to pros and newcomers alike. According to club members, the sheer number of people in the club creates a participatory atmosphere.

“The whole purpose of the club is to meet other people interested in what you’re interested in so that we can just shoot at our leisure,” Jessica Beneski said. She claimed the best part of the trip was “getting together with a bunch of fellow photographers and practicing our skills.”

Photographers on the trip compiled a wide array of different shots, such as the haunting fog-covered landscapes shot by Shawn Heyland and Aidan Ruel, to intimate up-close shots such as those by Casey Rogers.

The club wants to encourage anyone interested in photography to get involved even if it’s just shooting with their phones.

“The best part of the outing overall was just the huge group we were able to get interested in photography…. you don’t need a professional camera or professional like skills to join the club. We’re a bunch of friendly people interested in taking pictures. It’s a fun time,” Berube said.

“It’s not about critique… the shared passion is the heart of the club,” Taro said.

The Photography Club holds meetings every Monday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the Bumps Room in the Memorial Union. The club’s leadership plans on having one local and one longer distance outing per month.