Photo via geekwire.com.

4/5 Stars

Released Nov. 26, “Superintelligence” is a brand-new HBO Max feel-good romantic action comedy that will have you feeling thankful to be in a world without the spirit of a disembodied artificial intelligence (AI) breathing down your neck. 

“Superintelligence” was directed by Ben Falcone and written by Steve Mallory. This film runs for 1 hour and 46 minutes long and is rated PG for family-friendly viewing. 

With an all-star cast of Melissa McCarthy, starring as Carol Peters, an average woman whisked away into chaos, James Corden as himself and an AI as well as Bobby Cannavale as George, Carol’s love interest, director Falcone sets the audience up for feeling at ease and primed for a laugh with a familiar cast. 

Falcone also stars in “Superintelligence” as Charles Kuiper, an NSA agent. He is also the real-life husband of Melissa McCarthy, and this movie is their fourth film collaboration after “Tammy,” “The Boss” and “Life of the Party.” 

Opening on an average day in her neighborhood, McCarthy’s character of Carol Peters guides “Superintelligence” through the ups and downs as a mysterious AI’s chosen human “guinea pig” to determine whether the human race is deserving of their help in humanity’s quest to solve world hunger, end global warming, etc., if humans should exist as a slave to cognisant technology or simply be wiped off the face of the earth. 

A second narrative is introduced during Peters’ time spent with the AI to make “Superintelligence” a true action rom-com. Peters is led through many challenges, most of which revolve around her love interest, George, an English professor leaving for Ireland in three days, for which she needs to make things right after their last fling, all while being nudged along by the AI. 

One of this film’s strengths is the incorporation of the fantastic cast. If you’ve watched any of McCarthy’s other starring films like “The Heat,” “Spy” or even “Bridesmaids,” “Superintelligence” is definitely a “Melissa McCarthy movie” full of awkward comedy and childish humor. Additionally, Corden as the AI was surprisingly hilarious, pushing Peters into uncomfortable situations and providing comedic relief during misunderstandings and jesting arguments. 

Another strength of “Superintelligence” is its moderate pacing and colorful sets. Although this film is slotted within the action genre, its pacing falls more on the rom-com spectrum with a sci-fi twist, allowing the audience to view it at a walking-speed and soak up small moments between characters, allowing for ample space to make jokes and develop characters between interspersed confrontations with the AI. 

One of the aspects contributing to this feel-good movie success is the incorporation of vivid colors seen mainly in props, clothing and the general decor such as balloons fixed on the sidewalk, stripes and polka dots in Peters’ outfits or the set of Peters’ office interview. 

The only qualm with this movie may also deal with one of its strengths, which is the pacing of both narratives. Although it’s normal for each narrative to become longer with each appearance, eventually intertwining in the resolution of the film, some rom-com specific scenes may have extended a little too long as opposed to an even back and forth between such scenes and AI action. However, this is noticeably minor, and overall, doesn’t bog down the movie since both narratives wrap up together at the end.